Short Cycle

(Here’s a question I received from Marsha, along with my response.)

Question – Hi there, I really enjoy your website. It’s very informative. I would love it if you could help me out with a few questions. I have been doing a lot of research and reading, and due to many differences of opinion or perhaps different medical ideas of things–it’s been hard for me to find a few particular answers.

I track my cycles carefully w/out basal readings. Cervical mucus, being aware of recurring symptoms and signs, calender days (5 days in the red, and 26 day cycles), etc. I am always on time, and fairly regular.

I recently experienced an early period, occurring just 14 days after the first day of my period before that. Of course, this caused some confusion. Did I ovulate early, did I ovulate at all? Whatever the case, I chalked it up to recent stress and very strong feelings of needing a baby so bad I think I sent my hormones out of complete whack!

I suppose my question is, what is the best way to get back on track?

My educated guess would be, to go on as usual. Expecting the same regular cycle, just repeated early. And of course to track and find out if that is just the case. But I am very interested to know if that in the case of an early period, will I ovulate again? Given that yes, some months you may not even ovulate–more so, in regards to if I had in fact ovulated before the early period, could I again, or again even if I had not ovulated.

I can’t find these answers. I wonder if you have a period early, you ovulated before that early or not at all. And then, could you again either way?  Does it cancel it out? Something to that effect.

I am so sorry this sounds so all over the place. Perhaps that is how I am feeling. But I’m sure you’re quite used to panicked pre-conceivers! 🙂

I am also wondering about typical natural solutions to help increase conception. Things that could hinder such a process, like smoking or drinking. Certain foods, or stress. Or foods you should consider, containing particular minerals or vitamins. Caffeine?

Thank you so much for your time, I look forward to hearing from you.

My Answer – Thank you for your question, Marsha.

First of all, let me say that basal temperature charting can be extremely helpful for understanding your cycle.  It’s hard to say what really occurred during this cycle for you, and for this reason, I would highly recommend that you start using a basal thermometer to chart your temperatures each morning..

Basal temperature readings tell you whether or not you are ovulating based on a slight temperature rise after ovulation.  If you keep track of your temperatures for a couple months or more you will be able to know a lot about your cycle.

Most likely, you will ovulate again in your next cycle.  It may be that stress or illness or any number of things messed up your cycle for that month, and you’ll be back on track this next one.

Here again, it is very informative to utilize BBT charting, and my advice would be to start right away in order to keep better track of your cycles and know for sure if you’re ovulating.

I go into more detail on this page about BBT charting.

Concerning fertility diet and do’s and dont’s like smoking and caffeine, please see my preconception page for more information.

Best wishes to you for a speedy conception!

Finally Pregnant With PCOS

(This is a guest post from Susan.)

I HAVE BEEN DATING MY HUSBAND SINCE I WAS 20 YEARS OLD.  WE NEVER TRIED TO PREVENT GETTING PREGNANT, ALTHOUGH WE DID NOT HAVE ANY LUCK CONCEIVING.

WE WERE MARRIED IN 2007 AND WILL BE MARRIED FOR 3 YEARS THIS APRIL.  I WAS HAVING A LOT OF PROBLEMS WITH WEIGHT GAIN AND UNWANTED FACIAL HAIR (AND LOTS OF HAIR EVERYWHERE ELSE).  SO I BEGAN ELECTROLYSIS TO REMOVE MY FACIAL HAIR. MY MOM AND GRANDMA BOTH SEEMED TO HAVE THIS PROBLEM, SO I ASSUMED IT WAS HEREDITARY.

I WENT FOR ABOUT A YEAR OR SO AND SAW NO RESULTS, AND THE WOMAN WHO PERFORMED THE PROCESS, GOD BLESS HER, TOLD ME I SHOULD GO SEE A DR BECAUSE I MAY HAVE PCOS.  I THOUGHT “NOT ME,” BUT FINALLY WORKED UP THE COURAGE TO SEE THIS DR SHE TOLD ME ABOUT, A REPRODUCTIVE ENDOCRINOLOGIST.

HE RAN A SERIES OF BLOOD WORK AND COME TO FIND OUT MY TESTOSTERONE WAS DOUBLE WHAT A MAN’S LEVEL SHOULD BE, AND MY BLOOD SUGAR WAS WAY OUT OF WHACK.  I WAS EXCITED TO HEAR THAT SOMETHING WAS CAUSING THESE PROBLEMS, AND ALTHOUGH NOT CURABLE VERY TREATABLE.

SO I BEGAN TO TAKE 2000 MG OF METFORMIN DAILY TO HELP KEEP MY SUGAR IN CONTROL, AND ABOUT 1 YEAR LATER I HAD LOST 30 POUNDS.  I DIDN’T REALLY CHANGE ANYTHING, BUT I FOUND THAT THE MEDICINE HELPED ME NOT TO FEEL STARVING ALL THE TIME. NO MATTER WHAT, BEFORE THAT PILL I WAS ALWAYS HUNGRY, AND I COULD EAT ALL DAY AND STILL BE HUNGRY.

MY ENDOCRINOLOGIST KNEW HOW BADLY I WANTED TO BE PREGNANT AND REFERRED ME TO A FERTILITY SPECIALIST AFTER TRYING ON OUR OWN FOR SO LONG.

I BEGAN SEEING THIS DR. IN MARCH 2009. HE RAN A SERIES OF BLOOD TESTS, PAP SMEARS, ULTRASOUNDS, AND EVEN DID A PROCEDURE TO BLOW MY TUBES OUT TO MAKE SURE THEY WERE CLEAR AND OPEN.  HE SAID MY CHANCE OF CONCEIVING AFTER THIS PROCEDURE WAS VERY HIGH, MUCH TO NO SUCCESS FOR US.

SO THE NEXT STEP WAS TO TRY SOMETHING ELSE.  HE SAID I HAD A FEW OPTIONS – CAN TRY CLOMID (UGH ANOTHER PILL – NO THANK YOU!),  CAN DO GONAL F INJECTIONS (WHICH CAUSE YOU TO RELEASE MORE EGGS), ALONE OR ALONG WITH ARTIFICIAL INSEMINATION.

I SAID LETS TRY THE INJECTIONS, AND WE DID. I DIDN’T REALLY WANT ARTIFICIAL INSEMINATION, SO I ASKED TO TRY JUST THE INJECTIONS FOR ONE MONTH TO SEE WHAT HAPPENED.  AT THIS POINT I DIDN’T REALLY FEEL RUSHED, AS I HAD WAITED SO LONG ALREADY TO BE PREGNANT.

I DID THE INJECTIONS, WHICH REALLY WERE NOT BAD. I GAVE THEM TO MYSELF.  THEY TOLD ME THAT I MAY BE REALLY HORMONAL ON THEM.  I WASN’T REALLY.

ABOUT A WEEK BEFORE I WAS SUPPOSED TO START MY PERIOD I BEGAN WAKING UP DURING THE NIGHT, AND I WAS VOMITING IN THE MORNINGS AND JUST FELT CRAPPY ALL AROUND.  I WASN’T ABLE TO DO BLOOD UNTIL I MISSED MY PERIOD, AND I MISSED IT, AND THE NEXT DAY I FOUND OUT I WAS PREGNANT.

IT WAS TRULY A MIRACLE TO ME HOW IT ALL WORKED OUT.  I NEVER IN A MILLION YEARS THOUGHT I WAS GOING TO BE ABLE TO HAVE A BABY, AND NOW I AM 14 WEEKS PREGNANT AND DUE THE DAY BEFORE MY OWN BIRTHDAY.

GOD KNOWS THE PLAN, AND ALTHOUGH YOU DON’T ALWAYS FEEL LIKE THINGS ARE GOING YOUR WAY OR AS YOU WOULD PLAN FOR YOURSELF THEY ALWAYS WORK OUT IN THE END.

I HAVE BEEN SO SICK FOR WEEKS AND MISERABLE, AND I COMPLAIN EVERYDAY ABOUT MY ACHES AND PAINS,  BUT I KNOW IN MY HEART IF I WASN’T PREGNANT I WOULD BE SAD AND DEPRESSED. SO I DEAL WITH THE PROBLEMS THE BEST I KNOW HOW AND I TAKE IT ONE DAY AT A TIME, BECAUSE I TRIED SO LONG FOR THIS AND I WILL TAKE BEING MISERABLE FOR 9 MONTHS TO HAVE A GIFT THAT I NEVER THOUGHT I WOULD BE ABLE TO EXPERIENCE.

HANG IN THERE – IT WILL WORK OUT JUST WHEN YOU THINK IT WON’T.  I WAS SO SHOCKED TO BE PREGNANT. I THOUGHT “OH NO ARE WE REALLY READY FOR THIS?” I DIDN’T THINK IT WOULD HAPPEN, SO I NEVER LOOKED PAST GETTING PREGNANT.

When to Test For Pregnancy

(This is a question from one of my readers, who wanted to remain anonymous.)

Her Question: I’ve been having symptoms of pregnancy that I normally don’t have before Aunt Flo (my period).

I’ve been more tired, getting dizzy spells, nausea, and headaches. My nipples were sore for maybe a day or 2, but no more sore breasts. Also, lower back pain, and I even had mild cramping for about 3 days, but that ended yesterday. I’ve been feeling bloated as well.

Now some of those I do get before Aunt Flo but the others – Never. I’m at 10 DPO (days post ovulation) and had a BFN (big fat negative on pregnancy test) this morning.

I know it can still be early for testing, but I’ve also read that one sign women look for is CM (cervical mucus).

I don’t feel dry, but I haven’t noticed any CM. Does this mean I’m not pregnant?

My Answer:  Cervical mucus is definitely a good indicator of fertility, but many women get pregnant without it being evident.

Perhaps it stays inside the woman’s body instead of draining out because it’s not as prolific.

Getting pregnant in any given month is definitely a miracle. It’s amazing that all the things that need to go right do, in fact, go right in order for pregnancy to occur.

Hormones, our environment, what we eat, the timing of intercourse, the male partner’s health – All these factor into whether we get pregnant in any given month.

On another note, all the symptoms you described could be symptoms of pregnancy – or they could simply be symtoms of your impending menstrual period.

I understand the anxiety of the two week wait between ovulation and your period! Not fun!

However, 10 days past ovulation is usually too early to tell for sure if you’re pregnant. It’s possible to know with a very sensitive pregnancy test.

Sore breasts, cramping, headaches, dizziness, nausea, tingling nipples, food aversions, lower back pain, bloating – all these can be early signs of pregnancy. However, they may not be indicators of pregnancy at all.

So, when to test for pregnancy?

It’s best to wait until your period is due at about 14 DPO – and then wait a day or two more if you’re typically late. Then test when you’re a day or two later than normal.

I know it’s hard to do! I was constantly testing early and getting disappointed. But realize that typically you will understand all the signs and symptoms once you get a positive pregnancy test.

The best first sign of being pregnant is a positive pregnancy test once your period is late.

Here are more early pregnancy signs.

Also, here’s a quiz to help you know if you’re pregnant.

To learn more about improving your cervical mucus, see this page.

Hope that helps!

Can I Ovulate and Not Get Pregnant?

(This fertility question comes from Misty)

Misty’s Question – My husband and I have been trying to conceive for several months with no success. We really started trying in October, using ovulation kits and calculators, but still no success.  So now I’m wondering if I can even have kids.

My question is: Even though an ovulation kit shows I’m ovulating, I’m having sex at the right time and still not getting pregnant, does this mean that a woman can ovulate and not be able to have children?

My Answer – Misty, I wondered myself if I could have kids, so I understand your anxiety.

There are many different factors to conception. These include whether the woman is ovulating and whether the man’s sperm health is optimal. Another important factor is timing.

Even when all the factors are optimal with the woman ovulating every month, the man’s sperm health being very good, and their timing being perfect, there is still only about a 40% chance each month of becoming pregnant.

It’s not uncommon to try for 6 months to a year without success and not know what’s wrong. This is called “unexplained infertility.”

If you are ovulating, then there is always a chance that you can get pregnant. So don’t give up hope!

I have been pregnant four times with two ending in miscarriage before conceiving my two sons. The first time took me six months. Then it took me 13 months before I got pregnant again. These both ended in miscarriage, and then I got pregnant the month following my second miscarriage and carried the pregnancy to full term.

It’s hard to say why it can take so long. It’s a mystery that we cannot fully control or understand. All we can do is try our best to get our bodies as healthy as possible and get our timing right and leave the rest to the Creator of Life.

Please keep us updated!

Progesterone in Early Pregnancy

(This is a Success Story from Michele in New Mexico)

My story starts back in 2002 when I got pregnant for the first time.  I was active duty in the Army and with that job came alot of stress, physically and mentally.

I was to the point of being excited, and at week 8+ I ended up having a miscarriage.  I blamed GOD, which in time I knew wasn’t his fault, but there are reasons things happen.

Well, in 2008, I was not in the military anymore and I got pregnant again.  Things were going well, and at week 10+ I ended up having my second miscarriage and had to have a D&C.

This one was really tough, because my husband had been in Iraq for two weeks already.  Those are the difficulties of trying to have a baby.

Now here comes the most exciting part.  After my husband came back from Iraq after the second miscarriage, which was a year later, we got pregnant August 2, 2009, and on May 13, 2010 had the most beautiful little girl I have ever laid my eyes on.  She is the best blessing that GOD could have ever given to me and my husband.

I told my doctor that I did not want to get on birth control because we were going to try and have another one ASAP, but once again my husband was sent to Iraq, and when he came home on R&R to see us for Christmas and New Year’s, January 2, 2011, we conceived and are now 15 weeks pregnant.

We are due September 29th, but will have another C-Section, so it will be a week earlier than our due date.  I feel so blessed to have this happen to us and can’t wait to meet our new little one.

The thing going against me to have another one so soon was that I’m not getting any younger, I will be 34 when the new baby is born and we all know the older we get the harder it is.

But, let me tell you ladies, I was told that I needed to take progesterone pills to help me basically get through the first trimester and to get pregnant, and I believe that’s what helped with our daughter.

All I can say is keep trying and I PROMISE your dream of becoming a mommy will come true, and it’s the best thing ever.  My little girl is now walking at 10 1/2 months and is the sweetest thing you could lay your eyes on.

GOOD LUCK to everybody out there that thinks they aren’t ever going to have an Angel, because in due time it will happen.

Does His Fluid Matter When TTC?

Does it matter how much seminal fluid comes out of your guy when he ejaculates?

Okay, okay …

I know this is TMI …

But, this was part of a question I received from an avid subscriber.

So it must be something that needs to be addressed – right?

So I will address it.

The amount of his seminal fluid does not matter.  However, the quantity and quality of the sperm inside that fluid does matter.

Some women may think that more ejaculation fluid means that all is well with the sperm.  There are plenty of them, right?

Not necessarily.

The seminal fluid is only enclosing the sperm, but semen and sperm are different.

The semen is the entire fluid.  The sperm are the little swimmers that need to make it to fertilize the egg.  The health and vitality of the sperm is what matters.  And a larger number of sperm helps too.

This is why it’s important to get a semen analysis – either from your doctor or from an at-home kit like this one from Fairhaven Health –  Sperm Check Fertility Test

You may be thinking like the friend who contacted me – larger volume of semen means all is well with his sperm count.  This may not be so, and in many cases it can be resolved over a few months (more on that in a future post).

I recommend this at-home test for the privacy and accuracy it provides as well as its affordability. (Plus, they offer free shipping.)  Sperm Check Fertility Test

How Often to Baby Dance

So, how often should you “do the deed”? or baby dance?

Do you know? or are you just guessing each month?

Personally, I don’t recommend guessing, and it’s not really necessary with all the tools out there to help you get to know your cycle. But if that’s your style – go for it!

But if you’re trying to conceive and want it to happen more quickly, you might want to alter your methods a bit in order to speed up your chances.

I had an e-mail recently from one of my subscribers, and she wanted to know if having sex every day for 30 days was a good plan. I told her that she likely would burn out before the end of the month. Even the most healthy libido can’t go for 30 days straight (correct me if I’m wrong on this).

Since she knew about when she was supposed to ovulate, I recommended having sex every other day about five or six days before that date but not every day.

You see, sperm builds up in the woman’s body and can survive up to five days under optimal conditions. You still want to have plenty of good fresh sperm waiting once ovulation occurs, though, but every day is not necessary. If you are charting and using OPK’s, though, that’s another story (more on that in a moment).

When I was first trying to get pregnant, my OB/GYN recommended starting to have intercourse on day 10 of my cycle through about day 18 – every other day.

That’s a good plan if you have a normal cycle, but if your cycles are long or short or irregular, you need to be more focused. And if you want to get pregnant more quickly, then it’s important to be more focused and knowledgeable about your cycle as well.

I highly recommend using basal body temperature (BBT) charting as well as using OPK’s and cervical mucus observation in order to narrow down when you ovulate each month.

If you are using OPK’s, you will have a very good idea when you will be ovulating. Once the test is positive, you should ovulate within 36 hours. So, you stop testing, have sex that night and the next, then skip a night and have sex one more time for best results for that month.

Read more about determining your ovulation.

You can read more about BBT charting here,

OPK Testing here,

Cervical mucus observation here.

Sign up for my e-course and let me know if you have any questions, comments, or victories to share!

Weight and Fertility

(Here is a question from a lady on my e-mail list who wanted to remain anonymous.  She has issues with being underweight and wants to know how that affects fertility.  See her story and questions as well as my response to her.)

 

Question:  I have had no periods for four years but am otherwise healthy. I have had scans on my ovaries that are normal, and three blood tests suggesting that my hormones are in normal range.

The endocrine faculty at the hospital believe that my lack of periods is due to being underweight by half a stone. However I have always been very slim, other than a short spell at university.

My periods stopped when I stopped taking the pill, at my heaviest weight, and in the last four years I have only had three periods in total. I have had a lot of stress over the years and believe this to be the main cause of my problems, rather than my weight.

My doctor and the hospital are pushing me to start taking the pill again, but I don’t think this will help the probelem, just cover it up. I did agree to take some progesterone on two occasions for a week at a time, but even on the highest dose nothing happened. It only made me feel very anxious.

I am concerend that no periods for such a long time will impact on my fertility. I am 29 years old and would very much like to have children.

Does a lack of periods mean you cant get pregnant? How can I kick start menstruation? I have tried nutritional means but is there a more drastic approach?

 

My Answer:

Thank you for your question.

The short answer is that your weight and not having a period does matter when trying to conceive, and I do believe that your weight could be contributing to your lack of periods.

Being underweight or overweight does impact fertility. However, I don’t know what your doctor knows and only know what I’ve researched on my own.

You must have periods in order to get pregnant. Your menstrual period is the process that brings the egg out of your ovary to be fertilized. The bleeding signifies the end of the process and the beginning of the next cycle.

You’re right to not want to take birth control pills. That would only cover up the issue. There’s a reason you’re not menstruating, but I’m not sure what it is.

I don’t know of a quick fix for your problem. All I can advise is that you get to your optimal weight for your height and that you seek to be as healthy as possible.

The stress you mentioned could definitely be causing your problems as well and could be the factor in your being underweight also. Do all you can to minimize this stress and find relaxation time for yourself every day.

See more about stress here.

This may not be the answer you’re looking for, but a drastic change in your body could take some time and patience on your part.

If anyone else has any feedback, they can post what has helped them.

Please keep us all updated!

Getting Pregnant at 39

(This is a question I received from Shannon, followed by my answer.)

 

Question:  I will try to give you the Reader’s Digest version to shorten my question.

I am 39 and have a wonderful healthy little boy, Luke, who is almost 13 months. I went on the Mirena IUD after he was born and had that taken out in January. I also weaned my son from nursing around 11 months, as I knew I was wanting to try to get pregnant. I had a period on Jan 30th and began tracking my cycle.

I do think I was pregnant in February, and although I never had a positive test, I had symptoms. My breasts were tender, and I had a dull headache and backache. I was so excited to test, then I felt something weird in my abdomen one day at work. I had lifted something heavy and felt some sensations that I now think were a miscarriage.

Anyway, I was late the next month only about 4 days. I began tracking again. We had no luck in March. I felt myself ovulate (I think). My husband and I made love on days 9 and 10 and I think we did on day 12 and possibly on day 14.

I started one day early this month, and think I could have been off on my ovulation days. I did not use a kit and am not charting. I called my OB (who I LOVE!) He thinks I could have been pregnant and said all of this was a good sign. I am going in on day 3, which is tomorrow, to have some bloodwork done, and then he wants me to come in on day 10 to see if he can see when I am ovulating and when we should have sex.

Lastly, my hubby is on Lexapro for depression. He and I have never had issues when it comes to orgasm, but this last month it happened 2 times. He is great, and I am hoping it is not me putting pressure on him. One day was the day before ovulation.

Anyways, I really want to get pregnant again fast. My OB is great and will be as aggressive as we want to be. I guess all the tests and ultrasound on day 10 will all be good things.

Am I jumping the gun too soon? If we got pregnant once, can it happen again and fast? Did it happen a couple of months ago? I really need to try to stop stressing (easier said than done!!!!)

– Shannon – Littleton, Colorado

 

My Answer

I think it’s too soon for intervention, Shannon.

It’s possible that you miscarried, but chances are you didn’t do anything to cause it by lifting something.

When I was tracking my ovulation, it was not uncommon for me to be one or two days different from month to month, either by the actual ovulation date or by the luteal phase length leading up to my next period (luteal phase being the days between ovulation and the start of the next period).  So it doesn’t mean that you were off by when you thought ovulation was.

It is possible to put too much pressure on your husband.  I found it best to try not to let him know that it was “time,” although I know this can be very difficult to do.  Try not to stress too much over having intercourse enough times.  It’s not necessary to make love every day before ovulation.  Every other day is typically better anyway and gives your man time to “recharge.”

If you know in general when you ovulate (I would analyze my BBT chart to see what the typical pattern looked like for me), then you can kind of plan for tentative days to “get together.”

It’s good for the man to build up his sperm count for a few days leading up to the most fertile time for the woman, but try not to go too long (too long would be more than 5 days at a time).

Personally, I don’t think you need any intervention.  You haven’t really been trying that long since taking out your IUD. What’s it been – 2 or 3 cycles?

It took me 4 months of concentrated effort before I conceived my second son, which is really pretty good considering I was 41 at the time.

There are many different factors that go into conception, and all these factors need to line up just right to conceive in any given month.  Get all these factors in your favor as much as possible, and you should conceive in a few months.  I would give it at least 6 months before trying intervention.  Give your body a chance to do what it was made to do.

Hope that helps!

Please let me know if you have any more questions, and don’t hesitate to send your success story!

Your Ovulation Testing Questions Answered

I have had quite a few questions lately concerning ovulating testing with ovulation kits.  The following questions sum up what many women are wondering.  I hope the answers to these questions will help you too.

Question – I’ve been using ovulation kits starting this past Monday. The ovulation test came up with 2 lines, but one was very faint. On Tuesday I did another test, and it came up positive, but I had no discharge, so I decided to wait for clear, stretchy discharge.

Sure enough, on Wednesday I had A LOT of discharge, but then it dried up and my test came up negative. I decided to try for pregnancy anyway, but am a little worried that I may have missed it because of test results. So confused. What does this mean???

Answer – It’s best to start testing with the ovulation kits on around day 10 of your cycle (depending on your cycle length) with day 1 being the first day of menstrual bleeding. With ovulation test strips, both lines need to be about the same darkness for the test to be positive. This is different than pregnancy tests, with only a slight second line making it a positive result.

With ovulation kits, there is a control line that is always there and there is the test line that shows up when the LH surge is increasing. You need to wait until the test line is as dark or darker than the control line before considering it a positive. Once this happens, you should stop using the tests. Ovulation is supposed to occur within 12-36 hours of this positive.

Using these tests along with basal body temperature (BBT) charting will help you determine if you have, in fact, already ovulated or not. Simply looking at the consistency of your cervical fluid is not an indicator in itself that you already ovulated.

Question – I am on month 5 of trying to get pregnant. This is the first month I have tried the ovulation testers to test ovulation. My periods have remained regular since coming off the pill. I have a 26-day cycle, and I started the ovulation predictor kit on the day the kit told me to start tracking and I still haven’t ovulated.

Its Aug 2nd, and my period is due on the 14th of the month. How close to my next period can I ovulate? Should I keep testing or just start all over again after this period?

Answer – This really depends on how regular your cycles are. If you have been tracking consistently for the past 5 months, and you always have a 26-day cycle, then you can be pretty sure that this month will be the same.

You didn’t say whether or not you have been tracking your basal temperature each month. This is a better indicator of when you ovulate each month. Some times certain factors can alter your OPK test results – such as drinking too much water, taking medications, and not taking the test around the same time each day.

So what do you do?

Make sure to NOT test first thing in the morning. A woman’s LH will typically surge in the morning, but this surge will not show up for a few hours. The best time to check is between 12 noon and 8 pm each day, but it’s important to check around the same time each day.

Don’t test after drinking a large amount of water, as your urine will tend to be diluted. If your urine is diluted, you may get a negative result when in fact the result should be positive.

You may ask, “Well, how do I know if I’ve drunk too much water?”  If your urine is very pale yellow or clear when you urinate, your urine is probably too diluted. It’s best to not drink anything at all for a couple hours before testing.

If you are on medications, especially hormonal medications for fertility, check with your doctor first to make sure one of the ovulation kits would show accurate readings for you.

More about BBT Charting

All About Determining Your Ovulation Date

 

If you have specific ovulation testing questions that are not answered here, please ask in the comments below.